Fairymount Fine Foods

Mushroom Varieties

What are Mushrooms?

Mushrooms are the fruiting body of specific types of fungi. They typically appear above ground. Not all mushrooms are edible. Only eat those mushrooms that you are 110% sure are not toxic.

Even though mushrooms are in a kingdom of their own, they are more like meat than vegetables. They are high in protein and antioxidants. Because they are high in protein, and other trace elements that are usually found in meat, they are a great meat substitute. All mushrooms can be eaten raw but their nutrients are only unlocked after cooking. Mushrooms can be used in many different dishes such as risotto, stir-fry or mushrooms on toast. A rule of thumb, the more colour a mushroom has the more flavour it has.

History of Mushrooms & Humans

The earliest evidence that Humans were consuming mushrooms as part of their diet was found in a burial cave in Spain that dated back 19,000 years ago.

A body of a woman was found with several different mushroom spores on her teeth, indicating that she was eating several different types of mushrooms.

As early as 10,000 years ago halogenic mushrooms were being used in North Africa, Europe, north and south America.

The first evidence of human cultivation of mushrooms come from Japan where they were cultivating Shittake mushrooms 1800 years ago.

300 years ago, Button Mushrooms were first cultivated in France in old limestone mines on straw and horse manure. The techniques that the French developed was then used in England and then America.

Today 10,000,000 tons of mushrooms are being produced worldwide which equates to a $40 billion a year global industry. The production can be broken into:

40% button mushrooms

25% Oyster

10% Shittake

Verry little are produced Organically. I am the only organic mushroom grower in Queensland and possibly the only organic specialty mushroom grower in Australia.

Mushrooms, being a fungus, are very susceptible to residual fungicides from conventional cereal grain production. Mushrooms need dead plant material to grow on.

They break down the hard parts of the plant such as the lignin and cellulose and use the resulting products for growth. Most ouster mushrooms can be grown on cereal straws or other waste vegetation left after agricultural production, such as cotton trash, corn husks or sugarcane bagasse.

To ensure good fungal growth we need to ensure that no fungicides have been used. To ensure this I only certified organic products when forming my mushroom substrate. This then led me to become organically certified myself.

 

Toowoomba Mushrooms

Our Mushroom Varieties

Blue Pearl Oyster Mushroom

Blue Pearl Oyster Mushroom

Certified Organic

 
The Blue pearl Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacquin ex Fries)) is a beautiful mushroom with a steal blue cap. This colour is stronger in the juvenile mushroom and fades as the mushroom matures.

This species is distributed worldwide and has may different forms. The blue Pearl variety come from south east Asia. It is great for all types of cooking and is used in stir-fries, risottos or just simply fries with a little salt and pepper.

As these mushrooms are one of the most popular worldwide their nutritional content has been extensively studied. They have a protein level of between 10-30%, and contain between 30 – 144 mg/100g of vitamin C. Other nutritional elements include Niacin 109 mg/100g, Folic acid 65 mg/100g, and are high in Potassium 306 mg/100g.

White Oyster Mushroom

White Oyster Mushroom

Certified Organic

 

The white Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacquin ex Fries)) is a commercially developed mushroom variety that is a large, robust and produces numerous heavy mushrooms. It has the least flavour of all the mushrooms grown and can be used in any dish that button or brown swiss mushrooms are used.

Phoenix Oyster Mushroom

Phoenix Oyster Mushroom

Certified Organic

 
The Phoenix or Indian oyster mushroom (Pleurotus pulonarius (Fries) Quelet) was first described in 1821 and is a native to the Subcontinent. It can now be found growing throughout the USA and Europe. It prefers wormer weather and is extremely suited for cultivation in Queensland.

This is a large oyster mushroom variety and has a distinctive ruffled edge. It is brown in colour and has a moderately strong earthy mushroom flavour. This mushroom enhances any meal featuring fish, lamb or pork. It is also great in vegetarian/vegan dishes such as stir-fries. Adding the sliced is the most popular method.

Nutritionally they contain 14-27% crude protein and only 2% fat. They also have 51% carbohydrate.

Golden Oyster Mushroom | COMING SOON...

Golden Oyster Mushroom | COMING SOON...

Certified Organic

 
This is one of the most spectacular Oyster mushrooms. The Golden Oyster (Pleurotus citrinopileatus Singer) is a bright yellow mushroom that grows to a medium size. This species likes to grow in Asian Hardwood forests, o trees such as elm, beach, oaks and poplars. This mushroom is especially popular in Asian cuisine.

The nutrition profile has not been tested but is thought to be similar to that of the Blue Pearl. When cooking Gold Oysters, it has to be noted that that it should be cooked on a high heat for 15 to 20 minutes. This mushroom is extremely bitter and tangy when cooked lightly or eaten raw. This flavor is pleasant to few and distained by most. If they are fried to a crispy texture, they develop a cashew-like flavour and are a great crispy garnish to Asian salads.

The Golden Oyster mushroom has been referenced by P. Stamets (1993) to potentially cure pulmonary emphysema and have cholesterol reducing properties.

Elm Oyster Mushroom  | COMING SOON...

Elm Oyster Mushroom | COMING SOON...

Certified Organic

 
The Elm Oyster is a large oyster mushroom in the genus of Hypsizgus, (Hypsizgus ulmarius (Bulliard: Fries) Redhead). It has been recently moved out of the oyster mushrooms group as it is not a true oyster, even though it grows like one.

While this is a white mushroom, it has an intense flavour and has been compared to truffles. This mushroom is perfect for a risotto. It is a quite rare mushroom in the wild, growing high in the forests of Japan. Little work has been done on its nutritional content.

Even though it has not been scientifically studied for its medicinal qualities, there is anecdotal evidence that it has extremely high anticarcinogenic properties. It is also used in Chinese medicine for the treatment of stomach and intestinal diseases. Elm Oysters are currently under intensive research in Japan for their medicinal qualities.

Pink Oyster Mushroom  | COMING SOON...

Pink Oyster Mushroom | COMING SOON...

Certified Organic

 
Another eye-catching variety. The Pink Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus djamor (Fries)) comes from the pan tropical zones across the world. It is known for its rapid speed of growth and performs well in warmer growing conditions.

This species has a tendency to over run the growing facilities out competing all other types of mushrooms grown. The medicinal and nutritional content of this mushroom has not been properly studied as yet.

The pink colour soon fades when cooked. This mushroom may be an acquired taste for some people being more tart than other types of mushrooms. Some varieties may become tough when cooked as well.

Shittake Mushrooms  | COMING SOON...

Shittake Mushrooms | COMING SOON...

Certified Organic

Shittake (Lentinula edodes (Brkeley Pegler) are a Japanese mushroom used widely in Asian cooking. The have a meaty flavour with a creamy texture. They are packed with nutrients. Protein 13-18%; niacin 55 mg/100g; thiamin 7.8 mg/100g; riboflavin 5 mg/100g; ash 3.5-6.5%; fiber 6-15% and 2-5% fat.

In Japan Lentinan, a water-soluble polysaccharide, extracted from Shittake mushrooms, is approved as an anticancer drug. In the past 20 years over 100 research papers have been published on different cancer fighting compounds found in Shittake mushrooms.

This species has a tendency to over run the growing facilities out competing all other types of mushrooms grown. The medicinal and nutritional content of this mushroom has not been properly studied as yet.

The pink colour soon fades when cooked. This mushroom may be an acquired taste for some people being more tart than other types of mushrooms. Some varieties may become tough when cooked as well.

Do you have a variety you would like us to grow?

Let us know